https://www.asam.org/resources/publications/asam-weekly/asam-weekly-editorial-comment

William Haning MD

Dr. Mark Gold, well-known, and author of a blog deserving the strongest endorsement (“Research You Can Use), referred an article from Lancet by Gabrielle Campbell and associates, Volume 3, No. 7, e341–e350, July 2018:  Effect of cannabis use in people with chronic non-cancer pain prescribed opioids: findings from a 4-year prospective cohort study: [open-access].  The study enrolled 1514 participants with noncancer pain, of whom 295 employed cannabis for analgesia. It was conducted by a group that includes recognizable names in the field from Australia and the United Kingdom.  One sentence from the Findings section serves as a synopsis:  “We found no evidence of a temporal relationship between cannabis use and pain severity or pain interference, and no evidence that cannabis use reduced prescribed opioid use or increased rates of opioid discontinuation.”   While not designed to address individual cannabinoids, the study ought to serve as a brake on any riotous enthusiasm for providing cannabis per se as an analgesic.

Comment;

We found no evidence of a temporal relationship between cannabis use and pain severity or pain interference, and no evidence that cannabis use reduced prescribed opioid use or increased rates of opioid discontinuation.”

Indeed!

Dr. Raymond Oenbrink
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